Month: October 2023

School Resources

School Resources

The death of a family member, friend, or other significant person is a lifelong loss for children. It is important to note that grief reactions in children are varied, wide-ranging, and unique to each individual.

Our partners at the National Association for Children’s Grieve developed several resources designed for those in the school community supporting a child that is grieving. We encourage you to use and share them freely.


Caregivers and Schools Working Together in Partnership After a Death Guide

When your child goes back to school after the death of someone important in their life, it is critical for you to help the school understand how to best support your child during this time. Caregivers know their children best. It is the job of caregivers to help their children feel comfortable at school and empower teachers and other staff to create environments that will best suit the needs of their child. It is important that caregivers communicate with school staff concerning considerations that may be needed for their child. This may include anything from a bit of extra grace on difficult days to a request for the creation of an Individual Bereavement Support Plan.

Download this Resource.


Supporting a student who is grieving: Resource guide for administrators

Students who are grieving face a multitude of additional potential stressors during the school day. We know they struggle with emotional, physical, behavioral, and interpersonal reactions to their grief that impact their ability to successfully navigate the school environment both in the immediate and long term.

Download this Resource.


Individual Student Bereavement Support Plan

This document is a resource for supporting students returning to school after they have experienced the death of a significant person in their lives. When a student returns to school, they may feel alone and challenged by the task of engaging with their daily routine. Schools are in a unique position to provide support for students with thoughtful plans specific to the individual’s needs. Students grieve developmentally, and their needs are unique and changing throughout the days, months, and years ahead. Those students that need and receive grief support have improved outcomes socially, emotionally, and academically.

Download the Resource.


Rights of a Student who is Grieving

This document is a resource for supporting students returning to school after they have experienced the death of a significant person in their lives. When a student returns to school, they may feel alone and challenged by the task of engaging with their daily routine. Schools are in a unique position to provide support for students with thoughtful plans specific to the individual’s needs. Students grieve developmentally, and their needs are unique and changing throughout the days, months, and years ahead. Those students that need and receive grief support have improved outcomes socially, emotionally, and academically.

Download the Resource.


Supporting a Friend who is Grieving

Grief impacts many different parts of a person. It can change how we act, our emotions, how we hang out, or even how our bodies feel. If a friend or someone in your class has experienced a death, it can be di cult to know how to support them. You might even be asking, “Do they want me to ask about their person?” It’s important to remember; no two losses are the same. While there is no “one size, fits all” way to support a friend, this guide will provide helpful reminders, compassionate language, and ways to give your friend space to share their grief.

Download this Resource.

Children’s Grief Toolkit

Children’s Grief Toolkit

As part of the partnership, the NACG has provided a resource toolkit for professionals and families.

The toolkit includes:

  • Grief is an intricate collection of emotions that can weave through the fabric of our lives. While grief is often associated with adulthood, it is important to acknowledge the presence of grief within the hearts of children. End of life memorials and rituals can be difficult for a child to fully understand or participate in, but there are ways to aid them through this process. Download Children and End of Life Memorials/Rituals for more.
  • Attending a funeral can be a profoundly challenging and emotionally charged experience for people of all ages. However, when it comes to children, the weight of grief and the unfamiliarity of funeral homes can make the process even more overwhelming. Therefore, it is crucial to create a safe and supportive environment for children within funeral homes. Download Creating Space for Children in a Funeral Home for more.
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Ways for Children to Participate in End-of-Life Memorials and Rituals

When talking to children about the death of someone in their life, it is crucial to be honest with them. Childhood bereavement expert, Pamela Gabbay of the Compassionate Friends, provides insight on the importance honesty and why it matters when having these conversations with children.

NACG Find Support Map Directory

Enter your zip code in the NACG Find Support Map Directory to access support service providers in your community who serve children, teens, and their families who are grieving.